Saturday, October 16, 2010

The Man Behind The Magic


Date Placed: October 16, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: GreenJello
Planters: GreenJello and Teancum
Location: Mystery, Orange County, California
Status: Missing

************************************************
The Man has magically disappeared. :( I do not know when I
will be able to get this replaced. Stay tuned....
************************************************

From the New Orleans train stop, act like you're waiting for someone to come out of the restrooms. After you've scoped out the area, and the coast is clear along Front Street, go make a call between 15 and 19. Underneath the phone and up through the metal circle is the box.

Notes: I really hope I don't have to remind you to be extra stealthy in this busy, busy area. Please be discreet in the grab, go stamp in at a nearby table, and then make a second phone call to return it without detection.

Friday, October 15, 2010

A Pirate's Life For Me


Date Placed: October 15, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: GreenJello
Planters: GreenJello and Teancum
Location: Mystery, Orange County, California
Status: Active


There's treasure to be found in the Pirate's Lair, mateys! Between the rocky overhang and the end of the pirate ship, find the above location. Your booty awaits you deep under the bottom step, in the corner closest to the outside.

Notes: If you are not a stealthy pirate, do not search for this treasure! It's back under there pretty far (as to avoid detection), so please do not ask children to reach for it (use them as decoys, haha!). Be sure to replace all the way back under.

Thursday, October 14, 2010

The End Of The Alphabet


Date Placed: October 14, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: GreenJello
Planters: GreenJello and Teancum
Location: Zzyzx, San Bernardino, California
Status: Active



xy(xyyyyy)zz(yyyxx)zzyzxxxzzz(zzzzzzx)zyxxyyzxxxxxzz(yy)zzxzyxzx

Tuesday, October 12, 2010

Horse Hitchhiker #5

Date Placed: October 12, 2010
Letterbox: Hitchhiker
Carver: GreenJello
Planter: GreenJello

Who needs a "My Little Pony" when you have this little mustang instead?

Known Stops:
1. Fullerton, California
2. Vallejo, California

Bunny Hitchhiker

Date Placed: October 12, 2010
Letterbox: Hitchhiker
Carver: GreenJello
Planter:

This sweet little bunny might hop on by a letterbox you visit. Pick her up and take her for a ride!

Known Stops:
1.

Monday, October 11, 2010

The Headless Horseman


Date Placed: October 11, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: phynstar
Planter: GreenJello
Location: 2601 East Sunnyside Avenue, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah
Status: Active

The Haunted Village is an October special event at This Is The Place Heritage Park. Wind your way through old houses in the village, through the hills and down into the trenches. The highlight of their outdoor spooking is a live Headless Horseman!

Directions: As you enter the park, you will soon pass some very large statues/monuments on your right. Pull into the parking area just past those monuments. Find the horses-- the alert horse seems to be noticing a very large granite boulder just ahead and to his right. Move the orange rock, and then the smaller triangle underneath, and The Headless Horseman will be revealed!

Notes: Many thanks to phynstar for this wonderful stamp!

Sunday, October 3, 2010

Love-Locked


Date Placed: October 3, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: GreenJello
Planters: GreenJello and Teancum
Location: Lovers Lock Plaza, Lovelock, Pershing, Nevada
Status: Retired


Locking your love is the ancient Chinese custom of symbolically locking one's love on a never-ending chain. You can forever lock your love with a soul mate, family member, friend or anyone else who is important in your life. This ultimate romantic idea takes place at Lovers Lock Plaza, in Lovelock, Nevada. It's fun and easy, and there are several stores that sell locks right in Lovelock.

Directions: From I-80, take exit 106 and head into downtown Lovelock. Lovers Lock Plaza is located behind and to the left of the courthouse.

On the south-ish side of the center circle of love, you will see a smaller rock next to a larger rock. Move off the smaller rock, and another small rock will be revealed below. Move the second rock and reach deep beneath the large rock to find the Love-Locked Box.

Notes: PLEASE, ADULTS ONLY retrieving this box! Pay special attention to how the two small rocks hide the box and rehide the exact way you found it. This is a meticulously landscaped area, and if you do not rehide it to look natural and landscaped, it will be found!

Friday, October 1, 2010

Welcome To Nowhere


Date Placed: October 1, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: GreenJello
Planters: GreenJello and Teancum
Location: Empire, Washoe, Nevada
Status: Active


If you have ever been out in northwestern Nevada, you truly understand the phrase "Welcome To Nowhere!" It is a very sparsely populated area of the state, and truly defines the meaning of solitude. Empire, Nevada is just a few miles away from Gerlach, which is the gateway to the Black Rock Desert.

After seeing this great photo of the gas station/grocery store in Empire, I knew a box had to be planted there:


Unfortunately, when we visited, the sign was no longer up (and no Shrek or Donkey, alas!), but the sentiment still remains nearby.

Directions: When you see the sign off to your right pointing the way to Empire, pull over. Look at the base of the signpost closest to the road, under old vegetation and a flat rock. Watch out for pokies! PLEASE rehide very carefully, with the box under the flat rock and vegetation put back over it to hide the rock.

Thursday, September 30, 2010

The Blacksmith


Date Placed: September 30, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: GreenJello
Planters: GreenJello and Teancum
Location: Lahontan State Park - Churchill Beach, Highway 50, Fallon, Churchill, Nevada
Status: Active


In 1902, the Newlands Reclamation Act was passed that provided funding for irrigation products for the arid lands of 17 states in the American West. The act set aside money from sales of semi-arid public lands for the construction and maintenance of irrigation projects. The newly irrigated land would be sold and money would be put into a revolving fund that supported more such projects. This led to the eventual damming of nearly every major western river.

Much of the West could not have been settled without the water provided by the Act. With all the newly available water to irrigate, the West became one of the premier agricultural areas in the world. Bureau of Reclamation statistics show that more than 600 of their dams on waterways throughout the West provide irrigation for 10 million acres (40,000 km²) of farmland, providing 60% of the nation's vegetables and 25% of its fruits and nuts.

My great-great-grandfather, John William Small, was a skilled blacksmith who came out west to work on the Lahontan Dam project in Churchill County, Nevada. His legacy of work is still functional over 100 years later, providing essential irrigation water for the fertile farmlands in Fallon, Nevada, and the surrounding areas.

Directions: On Highway 50 east of Fallon, there will be a "split", with one way leading to Fernley (Alt. 50) and the other towards Carson City (Hwy. 50). Head towards Carson City/Silver Springs about 7 miles from the junction, until you see the brown sign pointing to "Lahontan State Park - Churchill Beach" and turn left. (If you're coming from Carson City, just watch for the same sign, except turn right.) Take the first parking pullout to your right, just after you cross the bridge. From here, you can see the dam off in the distance to the west.

Starting in the southwest corner of the perimeter of wooden posts, spy the old rusty pipe. Count 3 fenceposts to the south of this pipe. To the right of the third post is a large sagebrush. At the base of this sage, under old vegetation/tumbleweeds and rocks, is The Blacksmith. Please rehide VERY well with the rocks first, and then tumbleweeds on top of it.

Hearts Of Gold Cantaloupe Festival


Date Placed: September 30, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: GreenJello
Planters: GreenJello and Teancum
Location: Churchill County Fairgrounds, 333 Sheckler Road, Fallon, Churchill, Nevada
Status: Active

When I lived in Fallon many years ago, one of the highlights of the year was the annual Cantaloupe Festival. Fallon has been long-known for producing the most excellent cantaloupe, named "Hearts Of Gold". When harvest time rolls around, the festival of these sweet and juicy melons begins! There's cantaloupe ice cream, cantaloupe eating contests, the Cantaloupe Queen contest, and even a cantaloupe catapult! If you're ever near Fallon over Labor Day Weekend, be sure to visit the Cantaloupe Festival for an entertaining time.

Directions: From Williams Avenue (Highway 50), head south down Taylor Street. You will see the fairgrounds off to your right about 1 mile down the road. Turn right on Sheckler Road, and locate the main fairgrounds parking area. Across from the parking area is a paved bike path. Head west on the path about 100 feet to a telephone pole on your right. Move off smaller rocks in the SPOR to find the box.

Fallon Naval Air Station


Date Placed: September 30, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: Kirbert
Planters: GreenJello and Teancum
Location: Veterans Memorial Park, Fallon, Churchill, Nevada
Status: Active

The Naval Air Station in Fallon, Nevada is the United States Navy's premier air-to-air and air-to-ground training facility. Since 1996, it has been home to the Naval Fighter Weapons School (TOPGUN), and the surrounding area contains 84,000 acres (340 km²) of bombing and electronic warfare ranges. It is also home to the Naval Strike and Air Warfare Center (NSAWC), which includes TOPGUN, the Carrier Airborne Early Warning Weapons School (TOPDOME) and the Navy Rotary Wing Weapons School. Navy SEAL Combat Search and Rescue (CSAR) training also takes place here.

If you've ever wondered what it would be like to watch these marvelous jet aircraft in action, then take a moment to go visit Veterans Memorial Park, located just across the street from the military facility. You can watch the jets take off and land, and zoom above your head in impressive fashion.

Directions: From Highway 50, head south on Wildes Road about 3.5 miles. When you reach the corner of the high fence enclosed area of the Air Station, you will turn left on Pasture Road. Follow the road a little ways further; the park is located at the intersection of Pasture Road and Drumm Lane.

Standing on the cement pad in front of the stone altar to the BBQ gods, sight the tree at 320 degrees. (There is a geocache at 280 degrees, if you're interested). Behind that tree, under sticks and rocks, is the box. PLEASE REHIDE EXTREMELY WELL so that those searching for the geocache don't accidentally stumble upon it!

Notes: Most training exercises are done on weekdays. There are a few exceptions when special maneuvers are done on weekends, but your best bet is to visit the park during the mid-morning Monday through Friday.

Many thanks to Kirbert for carving the wonderful stamp in this box and providing the aircraft history below.

History: Entering the early 1970's, the Air Force had been flying very large, expensive fighter aircraft. It was decided to fund the construction of two smaller, cheaper demonstration prototypes to explore their potential. The Lightweight Fighter program pitted the General Dynamics F-16 against the Northrop F-17. The F-16 was clearly the better of the two, and the Air Force ordered them into production on the spot -- to the surprise of just about everyone. None of the manufacturers involved had been told that the demonstration program might lead to production contracts.

The F-16 was up to the task, though, and only required minimal revisions to become a successful combat aircraft for the Air Force.

The Navy was essentially told by the Pentagon that they should consider buying these lightweight fighters as well -- their fighters up to then had been even larger, heavier and more expensive than the Air Force's. But the Navy rejected the F-16 and selected the F-17 instead. It was claimed that this was because the landing gear on the F-16 was unsuitable for carrier landings and that the Navy wanted twin-engine aircraft, but those were just excuses -- the Navy already had aircraft with landing gear similar to that of the F-16, they already had single-engine aircraft, and their own studies showed that they lost more twin-engine aircraft due to engine failures than single-engine aircraft. The real reason was pride: the Navy had never purchased an aircraft that had been chosen by the Air Force first, and they weren't going to start now.

The next problem was that the Navy apparently had no interest in a lightweight fighter. They were more interested in a "multirole" fighter, something that could replace several of their existing planes. So they added features and capabilities into the F-17 until it grew so bulky that it couldn't perform well, then switched to
larger engines to bring the performance back, then larger fuel tanks to maintain the desired range, etc., etc. In the end the plane became so unrecognizable that it was renamed the F-18 and later the F/A-18 to reflect its multi-role capability. And Northrop was so overwhelmed by the changes demanded that they brought on McDonnell Douglas to help out -- and eventually McDonnell Douglas took over the F-18 program completely, resulting in lawsuits that went on for years.

The development program went on so long that the joke was that "The Navy is going to have a low-cost fighter no matter what the expense!" When it finally went into service, it was a fine aircraft, no doubt-- but a far cry from the "lightweight fighter" it had started life as.

You can read all about the F/A-18 Hornet on Wikipedia.

Grimes Point


Date Placed: September 30, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: GreenJello
Planters: GreenJello and Teancum
Location: Grimes Point, Fallon, Churchill, Nevada
Distance: 1/2 mile
Status: Active


About seven miles east of Fallon, just off Highway 50, is the Grimes Point Petroglyph Trail. The Trail features rocks and boulders with carvings as much as eight thousand years old, created by native peoples who were drawn to the shores of ancient Lake Lahontan. Be sure to pick up a free trail guide before setting out.

Directions: Standing in front of the two blue metal flat posts, sight the flat rock at 162 degrees that sits on the perimeter of the asphalt. Standing in front of that rock, take about 10 steps clockwise. There will be a large rock on your right. On the side facing the blue posts you came from, there will be some smaller rocks to remove to find the box.

Sand Mountain


Date Placed: September 30, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: GreenJello
Planters: GreenJello and Teancum
Location: Sand Mountain Recreation Area, Fallon, Churchill, Nevada
Distance: 1/4 mile
Status: Active

*********************************************** Sand surfing box is currently missing. Not sure when I will be back through to replace it. Pony Express is still alive and well. ***********************************************

About 20 miles east of Fallon, Nevada, is a HUGE sand dune out in the middle of nowhere along Highway 50. It is the remains of an ancient lake bed, the sands of which have traveled many miles to pile up in this area. It is a very popular recreation area, both with off-roaders and sandsurfers alike. This is an unusual sand dune, though, as it is made up of what is known as "singing sand". Slide down the sand on a steeper part, and you can hear the "booming" or "roaring" sound the sand makes as it moves down the hill. Very cool. This is one of only three singing sand dunes in the United States.

To ride ATVs or use the sand mountain for recreational purposes, there is a fee. (I'm sure if you asked to drive all the way to the sand mountain just to take photos or have a closer look, you could probably get away without paying if you ask them nicely.) Both boxes are hidden before the fee area.


Directions: As you're driving in, park in the first pullout on your right. Look on the east side of the main concrete sign under smaller rocks for the sandsurfer. After rehiding the box very well (please do not stack huge rocks on top of the poor little box-- pay attention to how you uncover it, and recover it in the same way), continue driving down the road until you see a sign that says, "Sand Springs Desert Study Area and Pony Express Station". Head left and park in the parking area. Start down the interpretive trail, and walk over to what's left of the Sand Springs Pony Express Station. What you are looking for is in the northwest corner of the living quarters. Move the flat rock off the top to find a rider waiting to go!

Notes: It is possible that there may be sand buildup on both of these boxes over the rocks. Just brush away what has collected. You may need to move out additional sand from the hiding "cavities" within the rocks before replacing the box.

Hickison Petroglyphs


Date Placed: September 30, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: GreenJello
Planters: GreenJello and Teancum
Location: Hickison Petroglyph Recreation Area, Austin, Lander, Nevada
Distance: 1/4 mile
Status: Active

The Hickison Petroglyphs are located approximately 25 miles east of Austin, Nevada. Watch for brown BLM signage on the north side of Highway 50, and you should find it easily! The ancient rock art is located along a short 1/4 mile interpretive trail. Ancient inhabitants of this area would come to this area of Nevada to hunt deer. The hunters would wait for their prey patiently, and as they waited, many created the rock art you see left today.

Directions: Leave the highway and drive along a well-maintained gravel/dirt road for approximately one mile. Park in the parking area (there is camping available here, too, if wanted), and begin your walk at the main sign that tells you about the area. Pick up a trail guide and begin your self-guided tour.

At #4, find the flat rock to the left. Move the smaller rock to find The Hunter waiting patiently underneath.

Just around the bend from #9 is a huge boulder on the left. About midway under the long side that faces the glyphs behind you, beneath smaller rocks, lies The Hunted.

Notes: Please be discreet and rehide VERY well, as these boxes are right on the trail. We do not want someone thinking they are trash and throwing them away!

Eureka Opera House


Date Placed: September 30, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: GreenJello
Planters: GreenJello and Teancum
Location: Ruby Hill Avenue, Eureka, Eureka, Nevada
Status: Active

Eureka was once a booming mining town. At the height of its prosperity, Eureka built an Opera House in 1880 for community cultural activities. It was the gathering place for grand events and dances, masquerades and plays, operas and concerts. It eventually converted into a theatre to show moving pictures, and eventually closed down in 1953s. More than 30 years later, it was restored to its former glory, and is now the showpiece of downtown Eureka.

Directions: Along Highway 50, the main street through Eureka, you will find the Opera House, the Jackson House and the Courthouse on the same block. Just up Ruby Hill Avenue (to the west of the Courthouse) is the Museum. As you're walking up to the Museum, notice the old mining ore carts in the Courthouse parking lot. In the cart closest to to the Courthouse, look on the east side for the striped rock. Small rocks next to it hide the box.

Notes: Please rehide VERY WELL, as this box has a high potential for discovery!

Nevada Northern Railway


Date Placed: September 30, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: GreenJello
Planters: GreenJello and Teancum
Location: 11th Street and Avenue A, East Ely, White Pine, Nevada
Status: Active

In East Ely, Nevada, you will find a National Historic Landmark. The Nevada Northern Railway was a railroad built primarily to provide rail access to a major copper producing area in White Pine County, Nevada. The railway, constructed in 1905-06, extended northward approximately 140 miles from Ely to a connection with the Southern Pacific Railroad at Cobre.

Faced with declining ore reserves and low copper prices, the railroad eventually shut down operation in 1983. Today, the White Pine Historical Railroad Foundation administers the property as the Nevada Northern Railway Museum, which operates a heritage railroad on a section of the former railway. Passenger excursion train service is offered between Ely, Ruth, and McGill using period equipment pulled by historic steam and diesel locomotives.

Directions: Head southeast on East Aultman. Take a left on 11th Street East (toward the mountains) and drive until you reach the Railway.

Between the restrooms and the track is a railroad switch stand. As you practice switching it back and forth, reach underneath for the box hidden under the flat rock and gravel. PLEASE rehide very carefully to look as natural as possible, as it would be easy to make this an "obvious" hide.

Wednesday, September 29, 2010

Slow and Steady


Date Placed: September 29, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: Teancum
Planters: GreenJello and Teancum
Location: Baker Archaeological Site, Baker, White Pine, Nevada
Status: Active

Great Basin National Park in Nevada is the home of the Bristlecone Pines, the oldest known living things on the earth. Be sure to take the 3 mile round trip hike to see these slow and steady monuments of time.


Directions: Either on your way in or on your way out of Great Basin National Park, take a quick side trip to this site to see where the Fremont Indians used to live. Here, you will find a Native American symbol of longevity, hiding under the flat rock in front of the left side post of the main sign as you reach the site.

Friday, July 30, 2010

Cecret Lake


Date Placed: July 30, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: GreenJello
Planters: GreenJello and Teancum
Location: Albion Basin Campground, Little Cottonwood Canyon, Salt Lake, Utah
Distance: 1.5 miles round trip
Status: Active

At the top of Little Cottonwood Canyon is a lovely little campground called Albion Basin. And from that campground is a lovely little hiking trail that leads you to Cecret Lake (pronounced like "secret"). If you hike in the earlier morning or earlier evening, you will most likely see moose on the trail. (Be wary! They are beautiful, but dangerous. Keep your distance!) The Albion Basin is also known for its amazing display of wildflowers in the spring (usually late June/early July) and autumn leaves in the fall (September/October).

Directions: Drive up Little Cottonwood Canyon up to the very top. The paved section of the road ends after you reach Alta. Continue up the dirt road to the very top, where you will find a parking area adjacent to the campground area. Park there. Head to the west side of the campground to find the trail. It's a fairly heavily used trail, so you shouldn't have much difficulty finding it. The trail will take you through the campground and in a southernly direction towards the lake.

Wildflowers-- When you reach the wildflowers information sign, head on the social trail directly to the west of the sign that leads to the giant split boulder. Wildflowers are hiding under the south side near the split.

Moose-- From the wildlife information sign, head on the social trail west of the sign about 100-ish steps to a large, flat rock on your right. It's next to a scrawny pine tree. Check carefully underneath to find a moose.

Shh! It's A Cecret!-- When you reach the lake, head to the left of the "No Swimming" sign less than 10 steps. To your left will be a large, long flattish rock. Look underneath.

Notes: This canyon is a watershed. No dogs allowed! Because of the high elevation, be aware that this trail may not be open until late June (typical), or even July (if there's been heavy snowfall in the winter). It can close as early as September, depending (again) on snowfall.

Sunday, July 25, 2010

Stewart Cascades Trail


Date Placed: July 25, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carvers: Woody Clowns (Sticky Geraniums) and GreenJello (Stewart Falls)
Planters: GreenJello and Teancum
Location: Stewart Cascades Trail, Aspen Grove, Alpine Loop, Utah, Utah
Distance: 4 miles round trip
Status: Active (only the Sticky Geraniums... the Stewart Falls box is missing!)

The Stewart Cascades Trail is one of the loveliest hikes in Utah. Your destination is Stewart Falls, one of the most scenic and photogenic waterfalls in northern Utah. It falls in two tiers, and is over 200 feet tall. It is an easy-to-moderate hike through a beautiful forest on the east side of Mount Timpanogos.

The trail is well-marked and easy to follow. The descent from the ridge/overlook area down to the base of the falls is quite steep (young ones should be held in check at that point) but this is a great family hike. Summer is a good time to make the trek, and fall is even better because the colored leaves are magnificent!


Directions: From I-15, take the Orem 800 North exit (#272). Head east and follow all the way to the mountains. When the road splits at the end, head to the left and start up Provo Canyon. Approximately 7 miles up, turn left at the Sundance turnoff. Continue on the Alpine Loop Road for about 6 miles, where there will be a fee station. (If you have a National Parks Pass, you can use that in lieu of the normal day use fee.) The parking area just past the fee station is where you will find the trailhead. Start to the right of the bathrooms, up the "stairs" and straight up the path to the brown trail marker that will point you in the right direction.

After you've taken [The Answer To Life, The Universe And Everything] steps from the trail marker, look to your left for a chunk of pink cement next to the trail. You will find some hidden Sticky Geraniums behind it, under some rocks. Please be very discreet and rehide EXTREMELY WELL, as this is a hugely popular hiking trail. (Sticky Geraniums are a plentiful wildflower found along the bottom part of this trail, as well as all over Mount Timpanogos. Keep an eye out for them as you hike!) Thanks to Woody clowns for this lovely stamp!

Continue on the trail to the falls. You will pass a water tank, gorgeous scenery, plenty of stinging nettle (know how to identify it so you can avoid it!), rock slides.... and then you will reach the waterfall overlook. Find the 4-ish foot tall wooden trail marker at the overlook area. Head the Sundance way, about 10-12 steps. There will be a pile of large rocks to your left. Under the large flat rock will be a Stewart stamp. Again, please be discreet and rehide well!

If you want to get to the base of the falls (and of course you do!), just keep heading down the Sundance way along the switchbacks.

Sunday, July 18, 2010

100 Degrees


Date Placed: July 18, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: Teancum
Planters: Teancum and GreenJello
Location: Herriman Splash Pad, 14070 South Rosecrest Road, Herriman, Salt Lake, Utah
Status: Active

The first half of 2010 is the hottest on record for the United States. Salt Lake City and the surrounding areas are no exception to this... unseasonably warm weather has us hitting 100 degree temperatures ahead of schedule this summer.

It's time to go cool off!

Directions: From Bangerter Highway, head west at the 13400 South intersection. Take a left on Rosecrest Road (5600 West). Follow the road south, driving past the park to your right. The Splash Pad will soon be on your left.

Find the fire hydrant on the west side of the park. Start walking north. At about 25 steps, follow the winding cement snake 5 steps. A large black boulder will be to your right. Look under it midway where it meets the grey boulder it sits upon. A smaller rock hides what you seek.

Be sure to replace the smaller rock back in tightly and cover with bark so that the landscapers won't accidentally find it!

Saturday, July 17, 2010

Hippo Hitchhiker

Date Placed: July 17, 2010
Letterbox: Hitchhiker
Carver: GreenJello
Planter: GreenJello

This hippo is ready to see more of the world! Anyone have room for a hippo in their letterboxing bag?

Known Stops:
1. Herriman, Utah (started)
2. Draper, Utah
3. Black Forest, Colorado
4. Dryden, New York

Thursday, July 15, 2010

Hobo Hitchhiker #4

Date Placed: July 15, 2010
Letterbox: Hitchhiker
Carver: GreenJello
Planter: GreenJello


This guy is traveling around these parts. Maybe he'll hitch a ride with you somewhere.

Known Stops:
1. Salt Lake City, Utah (started)
2. East Canyon, Utah
3. Black Forest, Colorado

Saturday, July 10, 2010

Lucky Duck Flea

Date Placed: July 10, 2010
Letterbox: Flea
Carver: GreenJello
Planter: GreenJello


You know you wanna get lucky and have the Lucky Duck show up in your things at a gathering, or surprise you in a letterbox!

Known Stops:
1. Lehi, Utah (started)

Wednesday, June 30, 2010

Escape From The Death Star


Date Placed: June 30, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: GreenJello
Planter: GreenJello
Location: Mystery, Utah
Status: Active

Click here for the clue hosted on Google Docs.

Noah's


Date Placed: June 30, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: GreenJello
Planter: GreenJello
Location: 644 North 2000 West, Lindon, Utah, Utah
Status: Active


Noah's is a multi-use facility for all life's events-- receptions, company parties, family reunions, you name it! There's indoor racquetball courts, indoor volleyball, pool tables, ping pong, and even an ice rink on the top floor!

Directions: From I-15, take the Pleasant Grove exit (#275). Head east off the exit, and take a right at 700 North (Lindon), and another right at 2000 West.

In the back garden area (east side of building), there is a bench in the southwest corner. Sit on the east side of the bench. Notice the skinny paver just over a foot long off to your right. Something interesting is underneath.

Thanksgiving Point


Date Placed: June 30, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: GreenJello
Planter: GreenJello
Location: Thanksgiving Point, 3003 North Thanksgiving Way, Utah, Utah
Status: Active


Thanksgiving Point is centrally located about half-way between Salt Lake City and Provo just off I-15 at the Point of the Mountain. Our signature water tower is easily seen from both directions just west of the freeway.

From I-15, take exit 284 (Alpine/Highland). Head west off the exit; turn left onto Thanksgiving Way and proceed about a half mile to Water Tower Plaza.

Water Tower: You've seen the iconic Thanksgiving Point water tower, but name withstanding, that's not all there is to Water Tower Plaza. You'll find distinctive shopping and dining options, along with beautiful outdoor spaces such as the Loggia and the Grape Arbor, both popular sites for receptions and parties. Come and experience it all.

Between the tower and the hotel are some landscaping rocks. Find the largest blackish one under the juniper and aspens. Deep underneath it is the pouch.

Dinosaur Museum: The Museum of Ancient Life has the distinction of being the world's largest display of mounted dinosaurs. Not only will you meet our fierce prehistoric friends at the museum, though, you'll also become a part of their world. While you're weaving through the exhibits, chirps of insects and growls of ancient creatures greet you in each hall. Exhibits like the Erosion Table and the Fossil Dig give you an opportunity be a part of the science of paleontology. Needless to say, this is not an ordinary museum.

On the east side of the museum, the top of the two-count double-decker rock formation on the cement seems to be pointing you to look deeply within the wall for a pouch.

Tuesday, June 29, 2010

Salt Lake 2002 Olympic Snowflake


Date Placed: June 29, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: GreenJello

Planter: GreenJello
Location: Mystery, Utah
Status: Active

Hmmm.... the Olympic Snowflake seems to have melted.

North of the metal circle, look between the huge flat boulder and the small flat boulder. Please reseal pouch and all bags, and rehide well! This is a VERY busy area, so please practice discretion. (Sunday evenings seem to be the quietest time.)

Sunday, June 27, 2010

Tanners Flat


Date Placed: June 27, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: GreenJello
Planters: GreenJello and Teancum
Location: Tanners Flat Campground, Little Cottonwood Canyon, Salt Lake, Utah

Status: Retired

Tanners Flat is a lovely wooded campground found just over 4 miles up Little Cottonwood Canyon. If you forgot some of your cooking gear, never fear! A couple of items are found in the ABC area of the campground.

Directions:

Frying Pan-- Find the two huge boulder tops sticking out of the ground near the reservation site to the east. Go around in the back and look for a rocky outcropping that flips up. Smaller rocks hold the frying pan in place.

Dutch Oven-- Search out where the sidewalk ends, and head up the social trail. Look under vegetation and rocks 15 steps up, on your right hand side.

Thursday, June 24, 2010

Ferguson Canyon


Date Placed: June 24, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: deniserows
Logbook: deniserows 
Planter: GreenJello
Location: Ferguson Canyon, Cottonwood Heights, Salt Lake, Utah
Distance: Less than 1 mile round trip
Status: Active


Ferguson Canyon is a lesser known canyon between Big and Little Cottonwood Canyons. It is a beautiful hike, green and covered in wildflowers during the spring and early summer. This is a popular place for people to walk their dogs, so bring along your furry companion!

Directions: From the mouth of Big Cottonwood Canyon, take Wasatch Boulevard south. Turn left at the first possible turn, which is Prospector Drive. Head right up the hill. Take a left on Timberline Drive. The trailhead parking will be on the right.

Just past the fenced in water tank, there will be a path to your right. Start climbing up (be sure to wear good shoes!). Climb to the small clearing that overlooks the water tank. The tree on the NW end of the clearing has rocks by it that you might want to check. Please rehide well to prevent accidental discovery!

Notes: Many thanks to deniserows for sending this lovely stamp and logbook to us from Alaska!

Monday, June 21, 2010

The Zoo


Date Placed: June 21, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: GreenJello
Planters: GreenJello and Teancum
Location: Rock Canyon, Provo, Utah, Utah
Distance: About 2.5 miles round trip
Status: Active

Did you know that there is an easily accessible cave up Rock Canyon in Provo? Bring along some flashlights, put on your hiking shoes, and let's go explore!

Directions: From I-15, take the University Parkway exit (#269) and head east. Follow it through many lights, and then head down the hill. At the bottom of the hill is a major intersection; turn left (you should be on 2230 North). Follow the road all the way up towards the mountains, and just after it makes a turn to the right, you will turn left on North Temple Drive. Follow that road to the end and park in the trailhead parking lot.

Hike up Rock Canyon about a mile. Eventually the trail comes to a wooden footbridge; do not cross it. Instead, follow the path on the south side of the river. About 30 feet past the bridge, follow a south-bound trail that leads you up the steep gully. Continue up the gully for about 300 feet and look for where the trail veers west. This takes you over a little rise, where you will then see a big boulder next to a tree. Walk straight forward until you hit a rock wall that is known by climbers as "The Zoo". Turn to your left, scramble up some rocks, and you will see the cave entrance tucked away in the rock. You will have to crouch a bit to get through the cave entrance, but you shouldn't need to be on your hands and knees. Immediately after the opening, the cave widens and provides enough room to stand. It goes back about 50 feet.

When you're done exploring the cave, head back the way you came in. When you reach the rise (just before you head back down the gully), look at the rocks to your left. Climb up and find The Zoo underneath where the photo shows.



Notes: Hiking shoes HIGHLY recommended! The footing while climbing up the gully is steep and loose. This is not a hike for very young children. If you choose to hike with children, they will need assistance to safely navigate the gully trail.

Nunn's Park


Date Placed: June 21, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: GreenJello
Planter: GreenJello
Location: Nunn's Park, Provo Canyon, Utah, Utah

Status: Active

**********NEEDS NEW LOGBOOK********** Not sure when I'll be back in the area, so if you're planning on going for this box, I'd sure appreciate it if you could bring a logbook along with you. Thanks!!

Nunn's Park is named after L.L. Nunn, a pioneer in the field of hydroelectric power, who became the operator of the first 44,000 volt hydropower plant in America harnessing the flows of the Provo River. Built on this site in 1897, the plant provided electricity for mining operations near Mercur, Utah. In time, Nunn sold his interests to Utah Power and Light, who eventually sold the ground to Utah County as a park site. Located alongside the Provo River Parkway and nestled in a grove of trees, Nunn's Park offers overnight camping, picnicking, fishing, biking, jogging, and just plain escape from the traffic of life. There are plenty of family campsites on a first come, first serve basis; a pavilion can be reserved for family or group use; there is a sand filled volleyball area, and open areas just right for contemplating nothing but your favorite pastime. If you look, there are even a few reminders of the century old power plant that once turned the lights on in a remote Utah mining town and put Utah and the Provo River in the electrical history books.

Directions: Take the Orem 800 North exit (#272) from I-15. Head east. It will eventually split; stay to the left and continue to head east up the canyon. Follow the signs to Nunn's Park, which will be on your right in about 5 minutes or so. (If you drive past Bridal Veil Falls, you've gone too far!) From the exit, head left and go under the road to find the park.

At the metal Nunn's Park gate, there are large rocks to the right and left of the road. Go to the left and look under the tallest one.

Squaw Peak


Date Placed: June 21, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: GreenJello
Planter: GreenJello
Location: Provo Canyon, Utah, Utah
Status: Active

Squaw Peak offers one of the best overlooks of Utah County. At night, the lights twinkle from one end of the valley to the other.

Directions: Take the Orem 800 North exit (#272) from I-15. Head east. It will eventually split; stay to the left and continue to head east up the canyon. Follow the signs to Squaw Peak Road, which will be on your right in less than 5 minutes. If you drive past Bridal Veil Falls, you've gone too far!

Follow the road up, up, up. At the T intersection, head right towards the overlook. When you get to the top, park and enjoy the view. When you're ready to stamp, look to the southern side of the loop with no rock wall. There are some boulders marking a trail. Look under the multi-colored boulder.

Grove Creek Trail


Date Placed: June 21, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: GreenJello
Planters: GreenJello and Teancum
Location: Grove Creek Trail, Pleasant Grove, Utah, Utah
Distance: 4 miles round trip (allow at least 2-3 hours hiking time)
Status: Active

A lesser known hike in the Pleasant Grove area is the Grove Creek Canyon trail. It offers an unparalleled view of the Utah Valley (you can see all the way to the windmills in Spanish Fork Canyon at some points!), and breathtaking waterfalls.

Directions: From I-15, take exit 275 (Pleasant Grove). Go east off the exit. At the intersection with State Street, continue straight through the light onto Center Street. Turn left onto 100 East, then right at 500 North. Follow the road to the very end, and park at the trailhead.

Start up the trail. You will be following the creek for the first half mile as you climb up, up, up. The second switchback offers you amazing views of the Utah Valley. After the second switchback, you will keep trekking up, up, and up. (This is considered a "moderate" hike, though if you're out of shape like me, it's pretty darn strenuous-- 2 miles, 1500+ feet of elevation gain.) You will cross a small waterfall/spring when you are a half mile from your destination. Keep hiking up, up and more up! There will be a first waterfall off in the distance to give you a taste of what's to come. Keep going! When you reach the view area, you will find a bench that someone constructed. Take a well deserved rest and enjoy the amazing view.

When you've caught your breath, continue on the trail for just a little while longer. WATCH YOUR FOOTING! It is wet and can be slippery through here. Cross the footbridge. At the end of the bridge, you will see a pine tree in front of you, slightly to the left. The box is under the rock at the base of the tree.

Notes: This is NOT a hike for young children! There are sheer dropoffs and loose shale on steep mountain sides. It may not be a good choice if you are afraid of heights. Dogs are allowed, though if yours has a tendency to wander off the trail, I'd make sure to keep them leashed and close by. Hiking shoes are HIGHLY recommended.

Sunday, June 20, 2010

Thompson Springs


Date Placed: June 20, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: GreenJello
Planters: GreenJello and Teancum
Location: Thompson Canyon, Thompson Springs, Grand, Utah
Status: Active

I love the area around the little town of Thompson Springs, Utah. The poor town hasn't fared well over the years; it is almost a ghost town now. But you will want to visit to find the real ghost towns up the canyons behind Thompson Springs.

Directions: From I-70, take the Thompson Springs exit (#187) and head north into town. Follow the main road as it winds through town and then heads to the canyons. Be sure to stop at the amazing Native American rock art site on your way up. Continue up the canyon, staying straight on the road. There will be side roads to the left and right, but you're interested in continuing up Thompson Canyon at this point. Follow the road until you see the sign reminding you to keep the water nice and clean. There are some wonderful abandoned structures to explore here, so pull off and park. When you locate the old beehive oven, look underneath the right support side. There's some smaller rocks and leaves hiding the box.

Notes: The road is not paved past the Rock Art site. A two-wheeled vehicle should be able to make it up the canyon just fine, unless there's significant spring runoff in the area. There are a couple of dips in the road, but slow driving will work just fine (as long as you don't have a super low clearance vehicle!).

Moab Essentials: Raft


Date Placed: June 20, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: GreenJello
Planters: GreenJello and Teancum
Location: Sandy Beach, Colorado River, Grand, Utah
Status: Active

Up for some river rafting? Then grab your raft for some of the best Moab has to offer on the scenic Colorado River.

Directions: Take Highway 128 east, just north of Moab, along the Colorado River (if you cross over the river on the bridge, you've missed your turn!). Enjoy the scenery as you wind your way along the beautiful Colorado, framed by steep red cliffs on either side. Eventually along the way, you'll find the Sandy Beach. Park, and head down towards the beach.

Find the Sandy Beach info sign. Look for the large, old cottonwood tree a handful of steps away from the sign. Go back behind the tree to find a raft tucked up inside a hole at the base of the tree. A rock covers the opening.

Saturday, June 19, 2010

Gemini Bridges


Date Placed: June 19, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: GreenJello
Planters: GreenJello and Teancum
Location: Gemini Bridges, Grand, Utah
Distance:  15.6 miles, round trip (driving), less than a half mile walking round trip (once you reach your destination)
Status: Active

Some of the most beautiful sites around Moab aren't available for viewing from paved roads. Jump into your 4-wheel drive vehicle, and bump your way into some of the most breathtaking scenery in the world.

The Gemini Bridges 4-wheel drive road is suitable for beginners. There is a well-marked path to the Bridges, so it is unlikely you will become lost.

Directions: From Moab, head north on Highway 191 about 10 miles and turn left at the "Gemini Bridges" sign. You will pass a parking lot, cross railroad tracks and turn right uphill in less than a mile. Follow the brown BLM signs that clearly show the way to Gemini Bridges. Climb up the twisting shelf road as it continues south. Descend into a wide valley and continue south past the distinctive Gooney Bird Rock (just after the campground). Turn right at the "T" intersection and climb a steep, sandy hill. Stay to the right at the next road intersection, left at the next one, and left again at the final intersection before your destination. You will shortly come upon an area that is cabled off; continue up the road a short way to the main parking area.

Walk the 300 yards to the Bridges. You will see a huge hole, a bridge, then the other bridge. If you were to head south across the fatter bridge, and keep walking straight, you would come to an old dead tree. Head to the left of the tree, and walk over to the orange, lined looking rock formations (larger to the left, smaller to the right). Go visit the smaller one to the right. At the base of this formation, on the left by the juniper, find the box hidden behind a stack of small, flat rocks.

Notes: Do NOT attempt to drive on this road in a 2-wheeled vehicle!!! Even though the rock grinders have tamed this road significantly, you still need higher clearance for the rocky parts and the ability to drive up a steep hill covered in sand. Please use the restrooms before starting this journey (sometimes there is a port-a-potty in the parking area at the beginning of the road near the Highway, but not always). Remember also that this is desert country. Always bring adequate water with you whenever traveling.

Moab Essentials: Dirt Bike


Date Placed: June 19, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: GreenJello
Planters: GreenJello and Teancum
Location: Amasa Back, Kane Creek Boulevard, Grand, Utah
Status: Active

Bring your dirt bike with you to Moab, and have a go at Amasa Back! You get sand, slickrock, and amazing views.

Directions: Head west at the intersection of Main Street and Kane Creek Boulevard (there will be a McDonald's on the corner). Stay to the left, and drive along the Colorado River about 5 miles until the road turns to gravel. Keep driving not quite another mile, and you will see the Amasa Back Parking area on your right.

From the Amasa Back Trailhead parking sign, walk across the road and find the hiking trail. From the brown "hiking trail only" marker, take 25 steps. Look to your left and see an old juniper tree on a small rock ridge. Underneath the rock ridge the juniper sits on, pull out a smaller block rock to find the dirt bike.

Friday, June 18, 2010

Moab Essentials: ATV


Date Placed: June 18, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: GreenJello
Planters: GreenJello and Teancum
Location: White Wash Sand Dunes, Grand, Utah
Status: Active

If you're in the Moab vicinity, there is one area that is particularly popular for riding ATVs. The White Wash Sand Dunes are located about 45 miles northwest of Moab. The dunes are quite scenic, with large cottonwood trees growing within them. Red cliffs to the east of the dunes provide a dramatic backdrop.

Directions:  To reach White Wash Sand Dunes, drive 13 miles east of Green River on Interstate 70. Take Ranch Exit 175 to the south. This county road is known locally as the Floy Wash Road. (This exit is seven miles west of U.S. Highway 191, which heads to Moab.) From 1-70, continue southwest on the Floy Wash Road for 12 miles (be sure to bear right 4.5 miles from Interstate 70, and continue straight at 7.8 miles from Interstate 70). Go east (left) at 12.3 miles southwest of 1-70. You will drive by some oil production facilities. Just follow the brown BLM signs to the Dunes, and you won't get lost. Park when you arrive at the brown "White Wash OHV Area" info sign.

From the sign, look east towards the dunes in the distance. Walk 25 steps down the hill towards the dunes. There will be a large rock to your left; look under it, sunset side.

Big John


Date Placed: June 18, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: GreenJello
Planters: GreenJello and Teancum
Location: Helper, Carbon, Utah

Status: Missing

************************************************
Big John has disappeared. :( Well, the box has disappeared,
but John is still there! I do not know when I will be able to
get this replaced. Stay tuned....
************************************************

Helper is a wonderful historic little mining town in Carbon County, Utah. Big John the Miner is a large reminder of where some of Helper's roots came from.

Directions: On Main Street in Helper, find Big John. You'll know him when you see him. Hmmm... seems that Big John has something stuck under his right heel.

Thursday, June 17, 2010

Hello From Idaho!

Date Placed: June 17, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: Blackvelvetrav
Logbook: Blackvelvetrav
Planter: GreenJello
Location: Red Rock Trailhead, Corner Canyon, Draper, Salt Lake, Utah
Distance: Less than a half mile round trip
Status: Active

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Directions: From  I-15, take the Bluffdale exit (#288). Head east from the exit. Take a right on Traverse Ridge Road, and a left on Mike Weir Drive. In just a couple blocks, the Red Rock Trailhead will be on your right.

Head up the trail, and when presented with a choice, go east. You will see a sign for the Bonneville Shoreline Trail-- follow it east. Keep hiking past the South Mountain Overlook sign (though you are welcome to detour!). Not very far past the sign, you will come out of the trees and see a large "hill" in front of you. This is "Potato Hill" (And no, I won't make you climb up it. This time.) Hike along the trail until just after it starts to dip down. To your left is a big rock. Behind it, under smaller rocks and leaves is someone waiting to say "Howdy!" to you. Please rehide VERY well with rocks and leaves.

Hello From South Carolina!

Date Placed: June 17, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: ElectricMedic
Logbook: GreenJello
Planter: GreenJello
Location: Carolina Hills Trail, Corner Canyon, Draper, Salt Lake, Utah
Distance: About a quarter mile round trip to box
Status: Active

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Directions: From Salt Lake City, take I-15 south to the Bluffdale Exit (#288). Head east from the exit (Highland Drive) until you pass the Equestrian Park (to the left). The next right should be Bechers Brook Way (13395 South). Turn there, and then make a right out of the circle on Aintree Avenue. Another right on Tuscalee Way, and follow that winding road almost to the top, where you will turn right on Carolina Hills Court. Park at the trailhead, and start up the trail, heading off to the left of the information sign.

Just after you pass the old water pipe culverts, there will be a clearing on the right that leads down the hill. Take 3 or 4 steps down (2.5 GrizzyGirl steps, she says) into the clearing area, and look to your right. You will see a bunch of rocks at the base of a tree. Move the black rock to see what's hidden under the tree.

Wednesday, June 16, 2010

Hello From Nevada!

Date Placed: June 16, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: salad tongs
Logbook:  GreenJello
Planter: GreenJello
Location: Battle Creek Canyon, Pleasant Grove, Utah, Utah
Distance: About a half mile, round trip
Status: Active


The first battle between the Mormon pioneer settlers in Utah and the Ute Native Americans occurred at Battle Creek, Utah, which is now called Pleasant Grove. (History of Battle Creek)

Directions: From I-15, take exit 275 (Pleasant Grove). Go east off the exit. At the intersection with State Street, continue straight through the light onto Center Street. Turn right onto 100 East and then left onto 200 South. Continue to follow 200 South eastward until you dead end in a parking area next to Kiwanis Park. Leave your car there, and find the trailhead off to your right from the Kiwanis Park sign. A brown trail marker will let you know that this is the Battle Creek Trail.

When you reach the mini-cliff face on the trail to your right, go to the west end of it. In the crook of the many-trunked tree, under rocks and leaves, something is quietly hiding. Please rehide VERY well, as this is a busy trail!

Notes: Should you choose to continue up the trail, you will soon see the lovely Battle Creek Falls. It's not that much further... you're about halfway there at this point. :)

Hello From New Mexico!

Date Placed: June 16, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: Astro D
Logbook: Astro D
Planter: GreenJello
Location: Grove Creek Trail, Pleasant Grove, Utah, Utah
Distance: About a quarter mile round trip to box; 4 miles round trip to the falls
Status: Active

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A lesser known hike in the Pleasant Grove area is the Grove Creek Canyon trail. It offers an unparalleled view of the Utah Valley (you can see all the way to the windmills in Spanish Fork Canyon at some points!), and breathtaking waterfalls.

Directions: From I-15, take exit 275 (Pleasant Grove). Go east off the exit. At the intersection with State Street, continue straight through the light onto Center Street. Turn left onto 100 East, then right at 500 North. Follow the road to the very end, and park at the trailhead.

Walk up the trail until you see the square with a lid. From the square, sight the rocks just up the hill at 250 degrees. Go approximately 10 steps up and look under the side of the rocks facing the square.

Notes: For those hiking past the letterbox to the waterfalls-- this is NOT a hike for young children! There are sheer dropoffs and loose shale on steep mountain sides. It may not be a good choice if you are afraid of heights. Dogs are allowed, though if yours has a tendency to wander off the trail, I'd make sure to keep them leashed and close by.

Tuesday, June 15, 2010

Hello From West Virginia!

Date Placed: June 15, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: Irish Ref
Logbook: GreenJello 
Planter: GreenJello
Location: 2950 S. Wasatch Boulevard, Millcreek Township, Salt Lake, Utah
Distance: About 1/2 mile round trip
Status: Active

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Directions: At the intersection of Wasatch Drive and 3300 South, head east through the light. Follow the road to the end and park. Hike up the trail to the left until you reach the first pair of wooden electrical poles. Box is at the base of the pole under rocks.

Hello From Maine!

Date Placed: June 15, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: mudflinginfools
Logbook: mudflinginfools 
Planter: GreenJello
Location: Mt. Olympus Trailhead, 5300 South Wasatch Boulevard, Millcreek Township, Salt Lake, Utah
Distance: About 1/2 mile round trip
Status: Active

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One of the things Maine is known for is their many lighthouses. Take a hike up the Mt. Olympus Trailhead, and you'll feel like you've climbed to the top of one. :)

Directions: Climb up the "stairs" to the top of the first climb. Head over to the lookout point on the left, where Interstate 215 stretches from each side of the rocky outcropping. From the viewpoint, find a trail that goes along the side of the main mountain, heading north. When you are lined up with an east-west neighborhood road on the other side of I-215, you should be standing on a large pile of rocks and boulders. Look under the largest boulder for what smaller rocks are hiding.

Hello From New York!

Date Placed: June 15, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: Sprite and Highlander
Logbook: GreenJello 
Planter: GreenJello
Location: Neffs Canyon, Millcreek Township, Salt Lake, Utah
Distance: Less than 1/2 mile round trip
Status: Active

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Directions: From Wasatch Boulevard, head east on Oakview Drive (4370 South). Take a left on Parkview Drive (4030 East). Then a right on Park Terrace Drive. And one more right on White Way. Park at the trailhead at the end. Start up the trail (either way is fine) by the sign. In a short while, you will see a very large orangish boulder on your right and a large orangish rock next to it. Look behind the smaller one.

Monday, June 14, 2010

Hello From North Carolina!

Date Placed: June 14, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: theseekers1108
Logbook: GreenJello 
Planters: GreenJello and Teancum
Location: Holiday Inn Hotel and Suites, 5001 West Wiley Post Way, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah
Status: Active

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North Carolina-- First In Flight. Head out towards the Salt Lake International Airport to catch this plane!

Directions: From West I-80, take the Wright Brothers Drive exit (#114). Turn left on Wiley Post Way (first left). From East I-80, take the 5600 West exit (#113) and head north. Turn right on Amelia Earhart Drive, and another right at Admiral Byrd Road. Take a left at Wiley Post Way.

Find the planter on the northwest corner of the hotel. On the north end of this planter, look under the thin end of the long, skinny rock.

Hello From Missouri!

Date Placed: June 14, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: Roly-polies
Logbook: Roly-polies 
Planters: GreenJello and Teancum
Location: Saltair, 12288 West Interstate 80, Magna, Salt Lake, Utah
Status: Active

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"Baton Rouge has no patent on imitation castles, however, and no monopoly of them." Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi

Directions: From I-80, take the Saltair exit (#104). Head toward the lake. Park outside Saltair (or inside, if you prefer). Head east from the yellow gate to the cement barriers. Stand between the 'No Parking' sign and the square cement block with a handle. Take 35 woman steps (or 32 man steps) along the cement barriers. To your left (you're probably about standing on them) are some large rocks. Look between them under smaller rocks for the box.

Sunday, June 13, 2010

Hello From Indiana!

Date Placed: June 13, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: Boston Terrorists
Logbook: Boston Terrorists
Planter: GreenJello
Location: Miller Motorsports Park, 2901 North Sheep Lane, Tooele, Tooele, Utah
Status: Active

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The Indianapolis 500, billed as The Greatest Spectacle in Racing, is considered one of the three most significant motorsports events in the world. In Utah, we have a smaller version of a motor raceway in Tooele, at the Miller Motorsports Park.

Directions: Enter through the Main Gate and drive to the Administration Building. Park in that lot. Go to the north side of the building and follow the black fence to the end, where it meets up with a chain link fence. In the corner of those two fences, under the cement and rocks, awaits a racecar.

Hello From Wisconsin!

Date Placed: June 13, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: cervidae
Logbook: cervidae
Planters: GreenJello and Teancum
Location: Pine Canyon Conservation Area, Tooele, Tooele, Utah
Status: Active

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Looking for deer? I know a place where they are abundantly present, especially around dusk.

Directions: From Main Street, turn east on 400 North. Proceed approximately 3 miles (if you reach the Gun Club, you've gone too far!) Set off the road to your left will be a wooden information sign board and gate shaped like a V. Going through the gate will put you into the Pine Valley Conservation and Wildlife Management Area.

From the information sign, sight the tree at 300 degrees. Walk 50 steps to reach this tree. Move to the opposite side of the tree and sight an almost circular copse of trees at 310 degrees. Walk 40 steps to reach these trees. In the center of them, under a flat rock, is a deer hiding from you.

Hello From Pennsylvania!

Date Placed: June 13, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: LightninBug
Logbook: LightninBug
Planters: GreenJello and Teancum
Location: Ophir, Tooele, Utah
Status: Active

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In 1865, soldiers in the U.S. Army noticed that Native Americans in the area were using bullets made of silver. The soldiers soon found where the silver was coming from, and proceeded to kill the Native Americans in the area to lay claim on the silver deposits. In 1870, the newly booming mining town was named Ophir, after the rich mines of King Solomon. Eventually, the deposits ran out, and Ophir became pretty much a ghost down. There are less than 25 people who live in the town now.

Directions: When you're coming into town, notice the sluice on the left, and the old mining equipment on the right. West of the mining equipment will find you two signs with rules. Do a little rock mining at the base of the south pole.

Notes: If the General Store is open, have a nice chat with the owners on places to go while in the area. Have fun exploring Ophir, but PLEASE do not trespass on people's private property!

Saturday, June 12, 2010

Hello From New Hampshire!

Date Placed: June 12, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: gollygee
Logbook: cervidae 
Planter: GreenJello
Location: Provo River Parkway, 800 North Canyon Hills Drive, Orem, Utah
Distance:  About a half mile round trip
Status: Active

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Directions: Take the Orem 800 North exit (#272) from I-15. Head east. Head up the hill, and then down again; just before you start to head into Provo Canyon, there will be a gas station and Subway to your left. Just past the Subway, turn left at the "Provo Canyon Parkway" sign and park in the trailhead parking.

Start down the paved path from the east end of the parking lot. Cross the cement bridge, and then the iron bridge. Walk past the Olmsted Power Plant to your left and then a bench on your right. Take 90 steps from the red fire hydrant. Look to your right-- under the east side of the very large boulder, behind smaller rocks, is what you seek.

Hello From Colorado!

Date Placed: June 12, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: Tai Chi
Logbook: preboxed 
Planters: GreenJello and Teancum
Location: Rock Canyon, Provo, Utah, Utah
Distance:  Less than one mile round trip
Status: Active

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Directions:  From I-15, take the University Parkway exit (#269) and head east. Follow it through many lights, and then head down the hill. At the bottom of the hill is a major intersection; turn left (you should be on 2230 North). Follow the road all the way up towards the mountains, and just after it makes a turn to the right, you will turn left on North Temple Drive. Follow that road to the end and park in the trailhead parking lot.

Start up the trail. Take the right hand fork and head on up until you reach the section where the two sides of the mountains jut out towards each other. (If you see the Chlorinator Plant building, you've gone too far!) Look to the right-- it's used heavily as a rock climbing and rappelling area. You want the huge boulder at the base and to the left of the rock slide. On the tree side, about halfway, the box is hidden deeply under.

Hello From Kansas!

Date Placed: June 12, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: Trifecta
Logbook: GreenJello
Planter: GreenJello
Location: Sunflower Market, 1357 South State Street, Orem, Utah, Utah

Status: Active

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This is part of the "Hello From The United States!" series of boxes.
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Hello from the Sunflower State!

Directions: From I-15, take the University Parkway exit (#269) and head east. Go through the light at State Street, and take your first right into the shopping area. Go to the east side parking lot planter that is closest to the main doors of the market. There are two evergreen bushes in this planter, with a rock between them. Look at the base of the bush next to the leafy plant, rock side.

Friday, June 11, 2010

Hello From Minnesota!

Date Placed: June 11, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: Dartmoor Dreamer
Logbook: Dartmoor Dreamer
Planters: GreenJello and Teancum
Location: I-84 West Rest Area, Mountain Green, Morgan, Utah
Status: Active

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This is part of the "Hello From The United States!" series of boxes.
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Minnesota is a very green place. Green forests, green parks, green wilderness areas, green trees, green meadows, green fields. What other green thing do you think Minnesota is known for?

Directions: Heading down I-84 West, you will find a rest area near Mountain Green, Utah, between exits 96 and 92. Find a place to park, and then follow the sidewalk up, up, up! When you reach the top, take a moment to sit and rest (if you're out of breath like me!). Look around-- there's beautiful views of Weber Canyon, and the town of Mountain Green to the northeast. To the northwest is a fence post that looks different than the others. Count 2 1/3 fence posts east to find something more green than Mountain Green and the surrounding green mountains!

Please be very discreet in finding and rehiding this letterbox. It is a little more exposed than I normally like, so be sure to rehide and recamouflage extremely well.

Notes: Please use only green ink or marker! This is a very large stamp, so be sure your logbook will accommodate a 10 inch long stamp, or bring appropriate sized paper.

Thursday, June 10, 2010

Hello From Florida!

Date Placed: June 10, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: Miss Chievous
Logbook: GreenJello 
Planters: GreenJello and Teancum
Location: Cove Pond, 6990 West Rose Canyon Road, Herriman, Salt Lake, Utah
Status: Active

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This is part of the "Hello From The United States!" series of boxes.
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The Cove Pond at Herriman Springs is a great little community fishing pond. Bring your poles, and enjoy some sunshine and fishing fun!

Directions: From Bangerter Highway, head west at the 13400 South intersection. Take a left on Rose Canyon Road (6400 West). At a stop sign, Rose Canyon Road continues to the right (6400 West continues straight). The intersection is marked as 13875 South Rose Canyon Road. Continue driving until you see the Pond on your left.

At the corner of Rose Canyon Road (14180 South) and Spring Canyon Drive (6990 West), find the fire hydrant. Look at the rocks behind it-- between the first and second rocks, a smaller one needs slid out to find the box hidden deeply under. Please rehide deeply under the rock and replace the smaller one to look like part of the landscaping.

Hello From Ohio!

Date Placed: June 10, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: Pearlicue
Logbook: Pearlicue 
Planters: GreenJello and Teancum
Location: Yellow Fork Canyon Trailhead, Rose Canyon Road, Herriman, Salt Lake, Utah

Status: Active

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This is part of the "Hello From The United States!" series of boxes.
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Be sure to bring the horses along with you (or bikes, or hiking shoes) to Yellow Fork Canyon in Herriman. This lesser known canyon boasts beautiful scenery and views over the Salt Lake Valley from the southwest.


Directions: From Bangerter Highway, head west at the 13400 South intersection. Take a left on Rose Canyon Road (6400 West). At a stop sign, Rose Canyon Road continues to the right (6400 West continues straight). The intersection is marked as 13875 South Rose Canyon Road. Drive to the very end (probably 160000 South-ish). Park at the Yellow Fork Canyon trailhead. Just past the yellow gates is a small trail to your right. Head up, and turn left at the really big rock. Duck under and then step over 2 tree limbs, and head around the next two trees in a line. Ooh! A bunch of large, reddish-grey rocks! There's a really big one to the top-right of the area. Move the littler rock under it to find Ohio.

Wednesday, June 9, 2010

Hello From Oklahoma!

Date Placed: June 9, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: Goofy girl
Logbook: GreenJello 
Planter: GreenJello
Location: Hidden Valley Park, 11700 South Wasatch Boulevard, Sandy, Salt Lake, Utah
Distance: Less than a mile round trip
Status: Active

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This is part of the "Hello From The United States!" series of boxes.
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The beautiful Scissor-Tailed Flycatcher is the state bird of Oklahoma. To find one of these lovely birds in Utah, head over to Hidden Valley Park.

Directions: From the east end of the parking lot, take the paved path up the hill. At the second Bonneville Shoreline Trail sign, head up the dirt path in the direction the sign leads you. Soon you will see a bench on the left, off the path and shaded by trees. Sitting on the bench, look behind and to your left. There is a bird nested in the crook of the tree trunks. Please note how the box is hidden so you can rehide it the same. We don't want it out in the open come winter!

Hello From Oregon!

Date Placed: June 9, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: Funhog
Logbook: Funhog
Planter: GreenJello
Location: Hidden Valley Park, 11700 South Wasatch Boulevard, Sandy, Salt Lake, Utah
Distance: Less than a mile round trip
Status: Active

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Since the Oregon Trail didn't come through Utah, the Bonneville Shoreline Trail will have to do. :)

Directions: From the east end of the parking lot, take the paved path up the hill. At the first set of benches, follow the way the sign points to the Bonneville Shoreline Trail. From the red gate at the top of the dirt road, 25 steps back down will bring you to a very large, flat topped boulder to your right. Between the boulder and the tree at 260 degrees will be the box. Cover well with leaves after replacing.

Hello From Texas!

Date Placed: June 9, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: jb kokopelli
Logbook: GreenJello
Planter: GreenJello
Location: 11755 Hidden Brook Boulevard, Sandy, Salt Lake, Utah
Status: Active

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This is part of the "Hello From The United States!" series of boxes.
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Directions: From Wasatch Boulevard, turn on Hidden Brook Blvd (2520 East). There will be a small parking area to your left not far from the intersection. From the Neighborhood Watch sign (better not look suspicious! :), walk up the social trail into the grassy area. Continue on to the orangeish boulder in front of you. Ten steps away is a good sized granite boulder in a clearing not far from the creek. Look underneath it, creekside. Rehide deeply under the rock!

Tuesday, June 8, 2010

Hello From Maryland!

Date Placed: June 8, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: PKBrock
Logbook: PKBrock
Planters: GreenJello and Teancum
Location: Little Dell Reservoir, East Canyon, Salt Lake, Utah
Status: Active

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This is part of the "Hello From The United States!" series of boxes.
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What is Maryland famous for?

Directions: Just past the Little Dell Reservoir fee area, you will find mile marker 3 near the yellow gate at the end of the no parking area. (We parked very quickly and planted the box; you should be able to stamp in quickly and leave without annoying The Powers That Be.) There's a few large boulders nearby. Look under the yellowish boulder on the side facing the mile marker post.

Hello From Illinois!

Date Placed: June 8, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: SweetEllGee
Logbook: SweetEllGee
Planters: GreenJello and Teancum
Location: East Canyon, Salt Lake, Utah
Status: Active

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This is part of the "Hello From The United States!" series of boxes.
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The Lincoln Highway was the first road across the United States of America. Conceived in 1912 and formally dedicated October 31, 1913, the Lincoln Highway was America's first national memorial to President Abraham Lincoln, predating the 1922 dedication of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C. by 9 years. As the first automobile road across America, the Lincoln Highway brought great prosperity to the hundreds of cities, towns and villages along the way.

The current day Interstate 80 follows a good portion of the Lincoln Highway. "Hello from the Land of Lincoln" is planted nearby I-80 to give honor to the great state of Illinois that produced such a fine man.

Directions: From I-80, take the East Canyon exit (#134). Head north towards the canyon. You'll go under a golf cart bridge, and then a bit further. Soon, you will see, on your right, the Camp Grant Historical Marker. Pull over and park. When standing in front of the marker, sight the third rock down at 110 degrees. Look behind and under that rock.

Hello From Washington!

Date Placed: June 8, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: Lemon Drop of the Gryffindors
Logbook: GreenJello
Planters: GreenJello and Teancum
Location: George Washington Park, Parley's Canyon, Salt Lake, Utah
Status: Active

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I grew up in Washington State, so this stamp is near and dear to my heart. Some of my favorite memories are carved on this stamp!

Directions: From I-80, take the East Canyon exit (#134). Head north. Turn to the right at the first road (there will be a sign that points you to Mt. Dell Recreational Area). Head past the golf course club house, all the way to the end of the road, which puts you into George Washington Park. Follow the signs to Washington Terrace (go past the first picnic area with a playground), which will take you past some of the golf course. When you reach the end of the road, you know you're in the right place.

From the middle of the bench in front of the swings, sight 50 degrees. It will be almost inline with the left hand side of the swingset support poles.Notice where that 50 degree line intersects with the bushes that are adjacent to the grass. On the road side of those bushes, there are three large rocks in a line. You want the right hand side of the right hand side.

Please be very discreet! This is a busy place. Rehide very well so that park personnel or children won't find it.

Notes: There is another letterbox in this park you might want to find while you're here. :)

Monday, June 7, 2010

Hello From Louisiana!

Date Placed: June 7, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: Mama Cache
Logbook: GreenJello 
Planter: GreenJello
Location: Trailhead, 9570 Wasatch Boulevard, Sandy, Salt Lake, Utah

Status: Active

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This is part of the "Hello From The United States!" series of boxes.
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A good portion of Louisiana was settled by the French, before the territory was sold to the United States. This stamp is a tribute to those roots, both in design and word, and is hidden across the street from the most famous French restaurant in Utah.

Directions: Find the trailhead on the west side of Wasatch Boulevard and park in the lot. Start up the trail (marked by a Bikes Yield To Pedestrians sign). Make an immediate left to head back in the direction of the road. A large cement structure should be just a handful of steps away. On the other side of the trail, across from the cement structure, are two boulders. Hidden between them, with rocks covering, is the box.

Hello From Alabama!

Date Placed: June 7, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: Furface
Logbook: GreenJello 
Planter: GreenJello
Location: Ferguson Canyon, Cottonwood Heights, Salt Lake, Utah
Distance: Less than 2 miles round trip
Status: Active

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This is part of the "Hello From The United States!" series of boxes.
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Ferguson Canyon is a lesser known canyon between Big and Little Cottonwood Canyons. It is a beautiful hike, green and covered in wildflowers during the spring and early summer. This is a popular place for people to walk their dogs, so bring along your furry companion!

Directions: From the mouth of Big Cottonwood Canyon, take Wasatch Boulevard south. Turn left at the first possible turn, which is Prospector Drive. Head right up the hill. Take a left on Timberline Drive. The trailhead parking will be on the right.

Start hiking! When you reach the boulder that's taller than you, look in the hidey-hole behind some rocks.

Sunday, June 6, 2010

Hello From Tennessee!

Date Placed: June 6, 2010
Letterbox: Traditional
Carver: Cheekee Monkey
Logbook: Cheekee Monkey
Planter: GreenJello
Location: Dry Canyon Trailhead, Lindon, Utah, Utah
Distance: Under 1 1/4 miles, round trip 
Status: Active

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The Wandering Raccoon From Tennessee
By: Cheekee Monkey

So you really do exist.
Slowly cautious,
Slumping by the window...
Wide as the screens where I've only
Seen you till now...
Where I sit and sit and
daydream---
You, foreign as inspiration,
Plodding as method...
Myopic, I take a moment to place you...
Plump as a homely cat and silent.
Thicker than fox,
And masked in movement.
Now in focus, catching attention,
They call you fun-bearer...
No wonder you go low-key
And come without a trace...
By the time I have glimpsed you,
You're elsewhere according to
Your nature...
Hand-scratcher, trickster,
Solitary, sneaky visitor.

The Wandering Raccoon From Tennessee has been seen recently in these parts....

Directions: From I-15, take the 1600 North exit (#273). Head east, and travel almost the full length of the road. Just before it turns to the right, make a left on Skyline Drive. Drive up the road for a bit, passing about 5 side streets on the right, and turn right on Dry Canyon Drive. Follow it to the end, and park in the lot.

Start at the trail at the north end of the parking area. Head to the right of an information sign, where a trail marker you encounter will inform you that if you are hiking, biking, or horsing around, you can proceed up the path. When you are almost centered between the two water treatment tanks down the hill, look back. A smaller trail shoots off almost in the direction you were coming. Take that trail.



Follow it around down the hill in a long horseshoe arc. (Oh, look! There's an exposed pipe next to the trail.) Keep trekking, until you're well past the water treatment tanks below you.(Oh, look! More pipes in the trail.) At the bottom of the S curve, you'll want to head up the spur trail off to the right. 13 steps up the incline will bring you to a wash on your right. 6 steps up the wash, on your left, is a SPOR in a tree.

Please rehide well with rocks and leaves!

Notes: The raccoon is the State Wild Animal of Tennessee.